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The same pine deck after a coat of Woodrich Brand Timber Oil, featuring the Western Cedar color. Striking!

Charming Pine Deck DIY Project in Waukee, IA, Protected by Penetrating Oil Stain

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What a charming and lively deck!

This pressure-treated pine deck in Waukee, Iowa is ready for outdoor gatherings after giving the wood a little care and extra protection. 

a pressure-treated pine deck ready to be stained Pine Deck DIY Project
A pressure-treated pine deck, ready to be stained

Before: Pine Deck DIY Project

The deck looked solid and standard, but pressure-treated wood needs extra protection if you want it to last. And freshening up the color never hurts. 

The homeowner Ronda wisely defended her deck against the rain and snow that plague the Midwest, while creating a cozy space with plenty of seating. 

While looking into the best stains for pressure-treated pine, she discovered that deep penetrating oil stains would protect her deck from both moisture and the sun’s harmful UV rays. Pressure-treated wood has chemicals in it that will fight rot and insect damage, but lumber used in outdoor projects needs a way to resist exposure to the elements. 

Ronda wanted a high-quality stain and a straightforward DIY project, so she chose our Timber Oil Wood Stain in the Western Cedar color. 

After: Pine Deck DIY Project

The reddish hue of Western Cedar complements the furnishings, and the Timber Oil will keep the deck looking fresh as it stains and seals the wood against rain and sunlight. Her deck is now a perfect oasis for enjoying nice days or hosting a backyard party with friends and family. 

There are no visible streaks or blotches, and we have to say this is a job well done. One of the advantages of a deep oil-based stain is how much it soaks into the wood, leaving no drip marks, running lines, or overlaps behind. 

Pine Deck DIY Project a pressure-treated pine deck stained with Woodrich Brand Timber Oil penetrating oil-based wood stain
The same pine deck DIY project after a coat of Woodrich Brand Timber Oil, featuring the Western Cedar color. Striking!

How to Get This Look

Pressure-treated pine is an excellent, economical choice for a deck that will last decades with proper care. It is clear that here is one homeowner who loves her deck! 

Woodrich Brand Timber Oil is our top recommendation for pressure-treated pine, because of all the extra protection it offers the wood. Ronda went with the lovely red Western Cedar out of Woodrich’s five colors. No one would blame you for copying her style, but you could pick up a  Sample Kit to find the best match for your home. 

Timber Oil is easy to apply, and you can choose your tools based on the project. A combination of techniques works best in our experience. The paraffin oil-based Timber Oil stain does wonders in a sprayer, for taking care of all the large spaces. Using a rag or brush on cleanup and detail work, you can reduce any potential mess. 

You can use a penetrating stain to renew old wood, but it works great on dried new wood as well. If you are building a new pressure-treated wood deck this summer, you will want to check if the wood is ready to be stained. The chemical process of pressure treating fills the wood with moisture, and it needs to dry completely before you can apply stain. 

Is the Deck Dry Enough to Stain?

While there are many ways to test if the wood is dry enough to stain, the easiest DIY method should only take a few minutes. Sprinkle water on the surface and see if it beads up or is easily absorbed. If the wood takes it all in, it is likely dry enough to stain. It can take a few weeks to months for freshly pressure-treated wood to reach this point.  

Of course, if you spring for KDAT (Kiln Dried After Treatment) pine, this process is much faster. If you are concerned about weather damage waiting for a deck to dry, KDAT lumber can save you time. To prepare KDAT pressure-treated wood for staining, you should use a deck cleaner and wood brightener before you stain, just like you would with naturally aged wood.  

One Day Investment, Years of Payoff

Staining a deck with Woodrich Brand Timber Oil only takes one thick coat and a few hours for the wood to soak it up. These two photos may have been taken just hours apart if it was a hot and sunny day.  

Penetrating oil stains can last for years, and are easily freshened up with a quick, light coat whenever you would like to restore the depth of color. This pressure-treated pine will look great for a long time, while Ronda is able to kick back in her comfortable deck chair and enjoy the rewards of her hard work and smart planning.  

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